Health care

Slovenia

Country Report: Health care Last updated: 30/11/20

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Beneficiaries of international protection are entitled to health care under the same conditions as nationals.

The Slovenian national system of health insurance, set out in the Health Care and Health Insurance Act,[1] comprises of compulsory health insurance and complementary health insurance. Compulsory health insurance covers only a part of the medical costs. In order to enjoy full benefits of the health insurance system, one has to apply for the complementary health insurance.

Beneficiaries of international protection are covered by compulsory health insurance on the basis of their international protection status.[2] They are encouraged by the integration officers to also apply for complementary health insurance, as without it the costs for medication and medical treatment can become very high. Persons who receive financial social assistance – which is most beneficiaries upon being granted status – do not require complementary health insurance and enjoy full rights without it.[3]

The provisions for children beneficiaries of international protection are more favorable: they are entitled to health care services under the same conditions as Slovenian children,[4] which means they do not require complementary health insurance until they reach the age of 18 (or until 26, as long as they are enrolled into school as regular students) and enjoy full rights without it.[5]

Beneficiaries suffering from mental health problems, including torture survivors and other traumatised persons are entitled to the same medical services as nationals. Specialised treatment for them is only organised through occasional programmes by NGOs and other actors.

In order to help bridge the language barrier, a manual – the “Multilingual Aid for Better Communication in Healthcare”, has been issued by the Ministry of the Interior in cooperation with other stakeholders in 2017. In the initial phase after being granted status, beneficiaries also enjoy assistance from the UOIM staff and NGOs. Nevertheless, due to language and cultural difficulties, practical access to healthcare remains challenging in practice.

 


[1]           Official Gazette of RS, No. 9/1992 and subsequent amendments.

[2]           Article 94(1) IPA.

[3]           Article 24 Health Care and Health Insurance Act.

[4]           Article 94(2) IPA.

[5]           Article 22 Health Care and Health Insurance Act.

 

Table of contents

  • Statistics
  • Overview of the legal framework
  • Overview of the main changes since the first report
  • Asylum Procedure
  • Reception Conditions
  • Detention of Asylum Seekers
  • Content of International Protection
  • ANNEX I – Transposition of the CEAS in national legislation